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TENTATIVE LECTURE SCHEDULE

CHEM 110 - Chemistry   Fall 2013 - 3.0 credit hours

 

Before the classes begin:

Message from Professor Ballantine regarding the labs (CHEM111, if you are taking them - added 23 Sept. 2013): "All introductory and general chemistry labs (111/212/213) will meet during the first week of classes at their regularly scheduled days/times for lab check-in and safety orientation. If you miss the lab check-in for any reason you need to contact your lab TA as soon as possible to make arrangements to complete the check-in as soon as possible. Additional information can be found at the Blackboard website for your lab section."

     Textbook - you can get the one offered by the NIU bookstore, or you can procure one, even an earlier edition, by other means. The bookstore offers materials (denoted as "RQ choose"). These were ordered by Prof. Ballantine, who could give you more explanation.  [From the Bookstore web page explanation: RQ CHOOSE- If a class has two or more books that have a RQ CHOOSE next to them then you need only pick one of those books for the class. The professor has given students an option to choose what book he/she may want. ]

eBook and Connect access. If you happen to have the eBook version and the Connect license, you can use the McGraw Hill website at your leisure. Register at
http://connect.mcgraw-hill.com/class/niu_fall_2013_chem_110
The name of the instructor will be shown as Lauren Harrell.

     Calculator is required - for the tests you will need a specific calculator the Texas Instruments TI-30Xa. No other calculator will be allowed. The NIU bookstore does not have them, but Walmart does, for about $10 (and that would be tax included). You can get them wherever it is most convenient and economical. Get them early before the first test (26 Sept. 2013), so that you have them and know how to use them.

 

The official syllabus was distributed as a printed copy the first day the class met. That is the binding copy. [Download here.] This web version is provided for convenience, but it may differ from the official version.

These are syllabi for the sections taught by Prof. Vanýsek. There are other three sections, taught by other instructors, and they will have their own syllabi.

 

 

INSTRUCTOR:  Dr. Petr Vanýsek; Office, La Tourette Hall 418

Meeting place:
    Sections 2 and T401, Faraday Hall 143, Tuesdays and Thursdays 11:00-12:15
   

 

INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Petr Vanýsek; Office, La Tourette Hall 418

OFFICE HOURS: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12:30 - 13:40. Other times by appointment only. I will help you with your course problems, but come to see me with questions and problems already at least partially prepared. Bring your class notes along. Do not expect the instructor to give you your own private make-up class. When coming to the office hours, be prepared to share the office or the time with other students.

TEXTBOOK: General, Organic and Biochemistry (sorry about the poor grammar of the title) Chapters 1-9, by K. J. Denniston, J. J. Topping, K. R. Woodrum and R. L. Caret, 8th Edition, Mc-Graw Hill 2014. There are different versions of this textbook and different editions. (My desk copy has ISBN 978-0-07-340276-5.) The full version has 23 chapters, we will cover only first nine. It might be cheaper to buy a used (with all the chapters) one from an outside vendor. If you use any of the previous editions, be aware that the page numbers and problems numbers may not agree with the adopted text. The contents may be also somewhat different although conceptually it should be the same.

CALCULATOR: Whereas there is no specific requirement to have the above textbook, there is requirement of a specific calculator to take the tests: The Texas Instruments TI-30Xa. Walmart has it (June 1, 2013) for $8.94, so does Amazon. Buy one. This is the specific model. Do not get, for example, the TI-30xIIS (solar, which has different functions).  When we perform calculations in class or during practice, all will be explained using this calculator. Have a calculator and a paper pad for calculations ready for each class period. The lecture will be often interspersed with your active participation. For tests and quizzes it is assumed that everybody has the specified calculator, a pencil, a student ID, and adequate knowledge to answer correctly the questions. You will not be allowed to use another calculator for the tests; you will be allowed to do the math in your head or on paper.

DATE

dd.mm.yy

TOPIC  

CHAPTER

27.8.13  

First day of the class: Introduction to the course. Methods

1

29.8.13

Methods and measurement

1

3.9.13

The structure of the atom, periodic table

2

5.9.13

The structure of the atom, periodic table

2

10.9.13

The structure of the atom, periodic table

2

12.9.13

Ionic and covalent compounds

17.9.13

Ionic and covalent compounds

3

19.9.13 

Ionic and covalent compounds

3

24.9.13

Ionic and covalent compounds

3

26.9.13

Test I

1.10.13

Calculations and the chemical equation

4

3.10.13

Calculations and the chemical equation

8.10.13

Calculations and the chemical equation

4

10.10.13

States of matter

5

15.10.13

States of matter

5

17.10.13

States of matter

5

22.10.13

Solutions

6

24.10.13

Solutions

29.10.13

Test II

31.10.13

Day off

5.11.13

Energy, Rate, and Equilibrium

7

7.11.13

Energy, Rate, and Equilibrium

7

12.11.13

Energy, Rate, and Equilibrium

7

14.11.13

Acids and bases and oxidation and reduction

8

19.11.13

Acids and bases and oxidation and reduction

8

21.11.13

Test III

26.11.13

Acids and bases and oxidation and reduction

8

28.11.13

THANKSGIVING

 .

3.12.13

The nucleus, radioactivity and nuclear medicine

9

5.12.13

The nucleus, radioactivity and nuclear medicine

9

10.12.13 Final - Answersheets Form A
     Form B
1-9

 

(You may be taking concurrently CHEM 111, the laboratory to accompany CHEM 110. This is a course separate from CHEM 110 and the laboratory (111) and class (110) grading is independent of each other.  The instructor responsible for CHEM 111 is Dr. D. Ballantine, Jr., La Tourette Hall 424.)

Schedule of tests:
      

September 26   Test I
October 29   Test II
November 21   Test III
December 10   Final

Ansers:

Form A
     Form B

Tests I-III are during regular class hours. The final is from 10:00 to 11:50. All in Faraday 143.
        

For the tests there will be a seating chart, with a seat number assigned to each student.

Results for the individual tests: Slips with your score and the list of correct/incorrect answers will be available for pickup in class, usually at the end of the first lecture following the test.

Posting of the final grades: Do not look for them on the Blackboard. However, once the grading is done,you will be able to see your grade in the unofficial transcript feature of MyNIU.

 

CALCULATOR:

TI 30Xa.jpg (599856 bytes) There is a required calculator for this course, the Texas Instruments TI-30Xa. When we perform calculations in class or during practice, all will be explained using this calculator. Have a calculator and a paper pad for calculations ready for each class period. The lecture will be often interspersed with your active participation. For tests and quizzes it is assumed that everybody has the specified calculator, a pencil, a student ID, and adequate knowledge to answer correctly the questions.


         The course relies on active knowledge of mathematical calculations and the ability to setup algebraic equations. Helpful for those insecure in mathematics are the following books: Miller, Lial, Schneider; Fundamentals of college algebra (MATH 110 book, or similar); Dorothy M. Goldish: Beginning mathematics for beginning chemistry, 4th Ed., Macmillan, New York, 1990. Walter J. Gleason: “Is your math ready for chemistry?” W. C. Brown Publishers, Dubuque 1993.

EXAMS AND GRADING:  Semester tests (3) worth each 100 points. The test with the lowest score will be dropped.  Note that the rule of dropping the score of the lowest-scoring test is also your insurance against missing a test. Missed test = 0 = lowest score is dropped and replaced by the average of the other two tests. Only one test will be dropped. There will be no make-up for tests for any reason.

Tests: 60% (300 points, i.e., 2 high scoring tests and their average are counted)
Comprehensive final test 40% (200 points) NOTE THAT TAKING THE FINAL TEST IS REQUIRED.
         [TOTAL 100% = 500 points]

 

Your class percentage will be calculated as the sum of all the points earned (with the lowest test score dropped), divided by 5. The grades will be as follows (verbal meaning as per the NIU catalog):
        

          A (Outstanding Competence) 92 % and more

          A-   (Outstanding Competence) 88 – 92 %

B+ (Above satisfactory competence) 84 – 88 %
         B   (Above satisfactory competence) 80 – 84 %

B-  (Above satisfactory competence) 76 – 80 %

           C+ (Satisfactory level of competence) 72 – 76 %
         C    (Satisfactory level of competence) 68 – 72 %
         D   (Marginally satisfactory competence) 56% to 68%
         F   (Unsatisfactory level of competence) < 56%


The tests will typically consist of the following groups of questions: 1/5 - straight (single equation) calculation, 1/5 - more involved mathematical concept, 2/5 - factual knowledge, based on the lecture and detailed in the textbook, 1/5 - factual knowledge based on information in the lecture. The tests will be multiple choice, 1 choice out of five options. Only the correct choice counts.

 

Class curve: Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry mandates certain class average to assure consistent grading across multiple sections, therefore your scores may be adjusted by moving some of the boundaries between individual grades. The mandated course average for CHEM110 is 1.85 GPA. (This usually works out as class average of 67 %).


Using the Scantron forms: Fill in the ovals using a pencil, either No. 2 or the equivalent HB hardness. Be sure that you fill in your last name (and fill in the corresponding ovals) and include your initials. If you have just one initial, leave the second field blank. If you change your name during the semester it may be more practical to keep using the original name.
         The block for the ID NUMBER has 9 spaces, which was originally intended for the social security number. The university may no longer use the social security number for identification. Instead you will use the "Z" number, issued to you as a computer logon and a general (e.g., library) identification number. It starts with the letter Z and is followed by 7 numbers, e.g., Z1032673. Omit in the SCANTRON the letter Z and write the seven numbers as your student ID starting at the leftmost column. It will leave three empty spaces at the end. If your number begins with zero, include it. It is important to use the number as the computer grading system tracks you by the number first and by your name only as the second. In rare situations there is more than one person in the class with the same last name and identical initials. The number, though, is unique. To obtain the "Z" number you can call 752-7738. (I suspect, this is on your ID card as well and you should have it on you, in case I need to verify an identity of a student taking the test.) If there is a “form” for the test/quiz (A, B, C, D, E) indicated on the top of your problem sheet, it means that different forms are used in the class. Fill it on the Scantron form. Answer the problems in correspondingly numbered lines.
         Sign the form: On the back of the form is a place for you to sign your name. Please, sign after finishing the test, not before. By signing, you are affirming that you have neither received nor given an unauthorized assistance in completion of this work and that you are the person whose ID is shown on the front page. For tests there will be a seating chart, with a seat number assign to each student.

Scantron form.jpg (1625255 bytes)

 

Note on mathematical background:

    This course of introductory chemistry is replete with mathematical problems, known as "word problems." In those, one has to figure out first what needs to be calculated and then do the actual calculation, usually not hard with a calculator. However, setting up the problems may be challenging for some.     

    Take, as an example, the following problem: Seven lemons sell for three dollars. How much will it cost to buy twelve lemons? This is a simple ratio calculation and the answer should be $ 5.14. You should try, right now, to do the math. If you are not comfortable with doing this problem, whether with a calculator or on a piece of paper, and do not know immediately how to set up the numbers to get the answer, then, you will have a major problem in this class. Do not take it, enroll instead in a math skills refresher course instead. 

ACADEMIC DISHONESTY: In general, cheating means presenting or using work that was not done entirely by you and, in the case of in-class examination, it includes also presenting or using your work that was written outside the classroom. You may not talk or pass notes to each other on any subject. Having other materials than those allowed for the work with you within reach during test or sharing calculators is cheating as well. During tests you must put away any devices that would allow you to communicate with others or access databases. In particular, you may not use a cell-phone or similar device during the test for any reason - not just to cheat, but also as a calculator, to check an incoming message, to check the time, etc. You are allowed to use only the specified calculator. Any other type has to be put away. Violation of this rule will result in zero on your work.

Other issues:

- Safety: In the case of needed evacuation (e.g., fire alarm) recall that the building is on a slope. Thus, the real entrances/exits (top of the lecture hall) will get you out of the building on the ground level. If you exit by the blackboards and continue straight and to the outside, you will also end up outside the building, on a lower terrain.
- 
No smoking in the building, no food or drink in the class.
-  TAPING/RECORDING OF THE LECTURE:   You are encouraged to take good notes, reflecting your interpretation and understanding of the lecture. However, you are not permitted to make verbatim recording or transcription of the lecture or videorecording of any segment of the lecture.
-  ATTENDANCE: Attendance at the lectures is not monitored but it is in your best interest to be there. Consider the following: (1) The tests are based on the textbook material covered in the class as well as the class material, which is not in the textbook, (2) Office hour cannot be used to catch up on material missed by a class absence. (3) One fifth of the questions on test is based on information given in the class but not in the book. LATE ARRIVAL TO CLASS is discouraged. It disrupts the other students and the instructor and if repeated, may be basis for barring from the class. If you absolutely must arrive late, enter quietly from the back and sit in the back. Only the persons enrolled in that class and that section can attend the lecture.
-   CELL PHONES AND THE LIKE:
An instructor who lets you squander your tuition by using class time to fuss with your iPhone is likely to have zero tolerance for distracting activities that make it hard for the rest of the class to pay attention.   E. Selinger, The Wall Street Journal, September 7, 2013, page C3.
Cell phones are great technology and it is great to have one with you for emergency. (Campus police: 815-753-1212). However, please, turn off your phones and other noise-making devices as a courtesy to others, and do not distract yourself by reading and sending text messages.
- No brown M&Ms whatsoever in class.

Supplementary Instruction
     As you know, this class has available a teaching assistant to help with supplementary instruction, Audrina Pryer. Here is her schedule: The SI sessions will be held Wednesdays in Faraday 237 (note: room changed in early October), 3-5 PM starting September 11th. Her office hours will begin this week (Sept. 4, 2013) in Faraday 247 (Chemistry help room) Thursday 4:30-6 PM and Friday 3-4:30 PM. 

 

 

Chemistry tutor schedule:

There are tutors available every day in Faraday Hall - Room 246. The schedule was not available at the time of this printing. Watch bulletin boards at the Chemistry hallways. The typical times are 8:30-15:30, with a break from 11:15-11:45.

 

 

 

Printed 14 June 2013

 


Class mandated average 1.7-2.0 per Faculty meeting Nov. 13, 2008

 

This Web version is somewhat different from the syllabus given in class. The web version will be also updated or corrected during the semester. For class policies, the printed syllabus, as issued in the class on the first day, prevails.
The departmental version at
http://www.chembio.niu.edu/chembio/courses/syllabi_current.shtml is not guaranteed to be up to date.

The pdf file of the syllabus distributed on the first day of classes is here: recycle3.gif (216 bytes)

Updated list of covered material and recommended out-of-class work: gto.gif (1935 bytes)

     Study guide for tests and quizzes.  gto.gif (1935 bytes)


 

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Alchemy symbols on the wall of Faraday 143.

Why is it interesting to take chemistry?

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Inception: 9 May 2005 (based on version from Fall 2004, Spring 2005 and Fall 2011 semesters)  
Last revised: 15 December 2013 18:26
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© Petr Vanýsek 
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